Not So Perennial Perennials

Not So Perennial Perennials

Posted on Jun 03, 2022 | by KK

Spring seemed to come late this year, with cool temperatures holding on in many areas of the country. Some of you let us know you still had snow in late April, and here in the Mid-Atlantic we’ve hardly had to turn on the air conditioning, as opposed to other years when we’ve had long 90 degree stretches in May. Of course, that makes it a little more challenging to decide whether last year’s plantings are just slow to emerge or if they’ve done a disappearing act. That can be extremely difficult for new gardeners—many’s the time in my previous life I had customers returning plants that were still alive but just hadn’t started new growth yet. One thing to remember is that “perennial” doesn’t mean “forever,” it just means that the plant takes more than one year to complete its life cycle, unlike annuals that grow, bloom, set seed and perish all in one year.


Garden and Wall Trellises by Classic Garden Elements

Garden and Wall Trellises by Classic Garden Elements

Posted on Apr 22, 2022 | by KK

It’s time to unleash your creativity outside! If you are visiting our website, you must be interested in sprucing up your garden or patio, and we are happy to say you are in the right place. In this article, we will introduce you to our wall trellises and stand-alone garden trellises, the perfect feature to brighten up any wall or lackluster spot in your garden.


Native Vines Perfect for Any Size Garden Structure

Native Vines Perfect for Any Size Garden Structure

Posted on Apr 08, 2022 | by KK

There's something so inviting about a vine-covered arbor or pergola. Whether used to create a welcoRed roses cover the elegant Kiftsgate Arch from Classic Garden Elementsming entrance, a shady garden nook, or softly frame a beautiful view, such a structure greatly enhances the landscape. There's no denying the drama of a red rose laden arch, or the romantic charm of a pergola draped in wisteria. But if you're trying to fill your garden with native plants, are there still good options?


Growing Food Crops in Limited Space

Growing Food Crops in Limited Space

Posted on Mar 01, 2022 | by KK

We’ve all learned a lot over the last few years—maybe the most important thing the pandemic taught us is not to take even the tiniest things for granted. Who would have thought it would have been impossible to find common items like hand sanitizer or cleaning products? Even now we’re seeing late repercussions as logistical issues are causing shortages of grocery items including poultry, meat, and produce. We’ve realized that if we want to ensure our healthy food supply, the more we can grow for ourselves (and share with friends and neighbors) the better. Even if you have a postage stamp sized back yard, or only a balcony, there are many ways to grow a lot in a small space.


Design a Landscape That's for the Birds

Design a Landscape That's for the Birds

Posted on Jan 24, 2022 | by KK

As a child, I remember spending many afternoons on my grandparents’ couch, gazing through their huge picture window at the birds visiting the feeders hung in the magnolia tree outside. It was the one bit of excitement that could be found at their peaceful country home, and I was mesmerized by the comings and goings, watching the flutter of red cardinals’ wings, the hopping of Carolina wrens and the speedy swooping of chickadees. And the music—trills, twitters, whistles, and sweetly sung notes, all part of a lively show enacted by seemingly delicate yet incredibly swift and agile feathered performers. I can still spend hours watching such a scene.


Flowering Houseplants: How Long Will They Last?

Flowering Houseplants: How Long Will They Last?

Posted on Jan 05, 2022 | by KK

Between now and spring, nurseries, garden centers and online plant dealers will attempt to entice you with promises of filling your home with beautiful blooming plants to tide you over until the real gardening season begins. They know we plant junkies and gardening addicts are desperate for a growing fix. As a former garden center plant buyer it was my job to find those beauties you just couldn’t resist and convince you they would flower and flourish inside with you until the weather breaks. Anything that would naturally or could be forced to flower in winter was in play—primroses, daffodils, roses, geraniums, cyclamen, African violets, orchids, begonias, kalanchoe and so many, many more, often dresed in something party pretty--a colorful wrap or adorable novelty pot to make them even more irresistible. So enticing........... but will they actually last? Well, that's open to interpretation. Some of them are certainly fine houseplants that have the capacity to rebloom for you without a lot of extra care. Some of them will bloom for a few weeks and give you the opportunity to summer them on the patio or plant in the garden to enjoy in the future. And sadly, truth be told, some are bound for the compost pile after blooming is finished, unless you have a merciful gardening friend with lots of extra time and space (who will be sensible enough to toss it but not tell you about it).


Fall Bloomers to Suit any Garden

Fall Bloomers to Suit any Garden

Posted on Oct 09, 2021 | by KK

Ah, the glory of a massive Joe Pye Weed in full September bloom, or the golden glow of amsonia with the setting sun behind. Two vistas that I’ll never see in my 20 x 20 yard. I envy those with too much space to fill—for me it’s difficult to fit four seasons of interest in a postage stamp sized garden. The same issue might plague beneficiaries of a larger garden that’s relatively mature but missing some flair in the fall. Like me, they don’t have room for 3 cubic feet of billowy aster or a hip-high wall of sunny goldenrod. Many of us might also balk at the constant deadheading required to keep summer bloomers going through fall. Even if you don’t mind the work, I swear sometimes it feels like caffienating a sleepy person at midnight—just let them rest already! And if you have some shade, ach, don’t even get me started! But there are some judiciously sized and fairly well-mannered perennials that will be happy to join your autumn soiree without bulldozing the other guests or drinking all the cider—or soaking up all the sun. Maybe one or two of these will make a pretty pop in your fall landscape.


Flower Seeds to Sow in Fall

Flower Seeds to Sow in Fall

Posted on Sep 01, 2021 | by KK

If you have any of these seeds on the list below give this a try.  You may need to do a little additional research to find the best time to sow in your area for a particular plant.  Depending on how cold your winters are, direct sowing could be accomplished from mid-summer to 8 weeks before your last frost.   For example, here in our Zone 7, late summer sowings would include biennials like foxglove and and Canterbury bells.  Hollyhocks and bachelor buttons can be sown from August through November, and larkspur, nigella, and poppies prefer sowing after the first frost.


Seeds That Won't Mind Being Left Out in the Cold

Seeds That Won't Mind Being Left Out in the Cold

Posted on Sep 01, 2021 | by KK

Thinking back over my gardening this past season, I remembered some seeds I bought for spring that never quite made it out of the pack. Ok, ok, not quite means not at all—they were tucked carefully away while awaiting the grow light I also purchased, which sits still unused as well. Life happened, things got busy, and……….there you have it. I know I can’t be the only one—I’ve seen friends with boxes full of seeds and plenty of good intentions. And then I remembered that just because I bought them for spring doesn’t mean I can’t use some now. There are many perennials and even some annuals that can be sown in the fall. Even better, some can be direct sown in the garden with a minimum of preparation. I suppose that means I won’t crack the box for that grow light open until late winter (hopefully the coming one).


Tropical Garden Style in Temperate Zones

Tropical Garden Style in Temperate Zones

Posted on Aug 01, 2021 | by KK

When designing a garden, a lot of thought is usually given to exposure, type of soil, maintenance requirements of various plants, and how the space will be structured. All very important, but to me the first question you should ask yourself is, “How do I want to feel when I’m in my garden?” Do you want to feel like everything is green, neat and tidy, so you feel the accomplishment of being able to move on to other things? Do you want to feel energized by bright blossoms and the activity of butterflies and birds? Do you need a serene space where you can feel at peace? How about a happy relaxed feeling like you’re on vacation on a tropical isle?





Discount Purchasing

Privacy Policy | Return Policy | Shipping Policies

© 2022 Garden Artisans, LLC

Mailing List


Once a month you will receive a newsletter via email from Garden Artisans. This newsletter is written by professional garden writers and will vary in topic from general gardening to birding or landscape design.

We also use this mailing list to alert customers of any sales, promotions or new product introductions.

×
;

Join our Mailing List


Once a month you will receive a newsletter via email from Garden Artisans. This newsletter is written by professional garden writers and will vary in topic from general gardening to birding or landscape design.

We also use this mailing list to alert customers of any sales, promotions or new product introductions.

We take your privacy seriously. To learn more, please read our Privacy Policy.

×