Fall Bloomers to Suit any Garden

Fall Bloomers to Suit any Garden

Posted on Oct 09, 2021 | by KK

Ah, the glory of a massive Joe Pye Weed in full September bloom, or the golden glow of amsonia with the setting sun behind. Two vistas that I’ll never see in my 20 x 20 yard. I envy those with too much space to fill—for me it’s difficult to fit four seasons of interest in a postage stamp sized garden. The same issue might plague beneficiaries of a larger garden that’s relatively mature but missing some flair in the fall. Like me, they don’t have room for 3 cubic feet of billowy aster or a hip-high wall of sunny goldenrod. Many of us might also balk at the constant deadheading required to keep summer bloomers going through fall. Even if you don’t mind the work, I swear sometimes it feels like caffienating a sleepy person at midnight—just let them rest already! And if you have some shade, ach, don’t even get me started! But there are some judiciously sized and fairly well-mannered perennials that will be happy to join your autumn soiree without bulldozing the other guests or drinking all the cider—or soaking up all the sun. Maybe one or two of these will make a pretty pop in your fall landscape.


Flower Seeds to Sow in Fall

Flower Seeds to Sow in Fall

Posted on Sep 01, 2021 | by KK

If you have any of these seeds on the list below give this a try.  You may need to do a little additional research to find the best time to sow in your area for a particular plant.  Depending on how cold your winters are, direct sowing could be accomplished from mid-summer to 8 weeks before your last frost.   For example, here in our Zone 7, late summer sowings would include biennials like foxglove and and Canterbury bells.  Hollyhocks and bachelor buttons can be sown from August through November, and larkspur, nigella, and poppies prefer sowing after the first frost.


Seeds That Won't Mind Being Left Out in the Cold

Seeds That Won't Mind Being Left Out in the Cold

Posted on Sep 01, 2021 | by KK

Thinking back over my gardening this past season, I remembered some seeds I bought for spring that never quite made it out of the pack. Ok, ok, not quite means not at all—they were tucked carefully away while awaiting the grow light I also purchased, which sits still unused as well. Life happened, things got busy, and……….there you have it. I know I can’t be the only one—I’ve seen friends with boxes full of seeds and plenty of good intentions. And then I remembered that just because I bought them for spring doesn’t mean I can’t use some now. There are many perennials and even some annuals that can be sown in the fall. Even better, some can be direct sown in the garden with a minimum of preparation. I suppose that means I won’t crack the box for that grow light open until late winter (hopefully the coming one).


Tropical Garden Style in Temperate Zones

Tropical Garden Style in Temperate Zones

Posted on Aug 01, 2021 | by KK

When designing a garden, a lot of thought is usually given to exposure, type of soil, maintenance requirements of various plants, and how the space will be structured. All very important, but to me the first question you should ask yourself is, “How do I want to feel when I’m in my garden?” Do you want to feel like everything is green, neat and tidy, so you feel the accomplishment of being able to move on to other things? Do you want to feel energized by bright blossoms and the activity of butterflies and birds? Do you need a serene space where you can feel at peace? How about a happy relaxed feeling like you’re on vacation on a tropical isle?


Preserving our Native Food Crop Biodiversity

Preserving our Native Food Crop Biodiversity

Posted on Feb 01, 2021 | by KK

Growing heirloom vegetables is tremendously popular with many home gardeners, as those varieties are considered more flavorful than today’s hybrids. But there’s a lot more to think about than just a tastier tomato for your burger. Food crops native to the Americas have, and are continuing to undergo significant changes, as a result of hybridization, genetic modification, loss of habitat and climate change. Preserving plant biodiversity by recognizing the value of those “forgotten” crops is important to our future.


Houseplant Growing Tips

Posted on Jan 08, 2021 | by KK

Watering: More houseplants die from overwatering than anything else. Most houseplants like to dry out between waterings. Some can dry out a lot (snake plants) some moderately (pothos, philodendron, dracaena canes), and some just a little (peace lily). So how do you know when that is achieved? There are several ways you can gauge this, and it’s best to combine all the methods until you have a good schedule established:


Best Low-Maintenance Houseplants

Best Low-Maintenance Houseplants

Posted on Jan 07, 2021 | by KK

Spending a lot of time at home lately? Now that it's winter, are you feeling a bit confined, and finding the air a bit stuffy? Do you need to breathe some life into your workspace, or encourage peace and relaxation in your living area? One of the best ways to tackle those issues is to add some plants to your home. Bringing in a bit of green allows you to connect with nature, relieve stress, boost your mood, and even improve the air you breathe. It doesn't have to be difficult if you make the right choices--instead of a fussy, high-maintenance house guest, you can have a mellow, relatively self-sufficient friend for life. Read on for our suggested list of easy care plants that will make you glad they were invited, and click here for general houseplant growing tips.





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